Pointer Training – Help & Advice

The Pointer, or English Pointer to be more precise, is a great companion for anyone who lives an active life. Known as a true sporting dog, Pointers are not to be confined by the four corners of your home, and instead, should roam free as they are both energetic and athletic. That being said, are you having trouble when it comes to Pointer training?

Pointers are happiest when they are running; that is why they are mostly rowdy, add the fact that they have ADD, finding different sights, sounds, and scents easily distracting them. And as such as they are, they do make great companions but because of their personality a lot of pet owners and their family find Pointer training challenging.

Though it may take a lot of time and a lot of effort to train your Pointer it is possible and highly necessary to train them even with the basic obedience. Since Pointers love to chase whatever it is that catches their attention, it is imperative to at least have them trained to know sit and stay.

Pointer Training

Before even undergoing obedience training, there are some things to consider first. When it comes to Pointer training, an increase in the level of activity is required. Making them run may not be enough; give them tiring exercises so as to expend all of their energy and wear them out. If you do leave them with a hint of energy, it will just be diverted into annoying or even destructive behavior, specifically barking, biting, chewing, and etc.

So allow them to run wild in a fenced area where they can still be free and safe.

The next thing to consider in Pointer training is to do it in a quiet place. Since Pointers do have ADD, the slightest distraction can send them off chasing something aimlessly. Remember though, that when training them, it is best to keep it brief; do not train them for extended periods of time as they will grow bored of it.

Also, when training your Pointer, make sure you are not in a rush, so be patient; do not do it when you are feeling emotionally unbalanced, meaning when you are upset, frustrated, depressed, or when you are sick.

For the obedience training, it is best to start with sit.To do this, when you see that your Pointer is about to actually sit down, give him the command to sit, then give him positive reinforcement by praising him and giving him treats. With enough repetitions, they will soon make that mental association.

For stay, try saying it in affirm yet commanding tone. If he does stay in place even for just a few seconds, praise and reward them, again, repetition is the key for them to make the mental association.

When it comes to the command come, begin by giving them a treat whenever he comes to you this will make the whole experience for them pleasant. Have them sit first, call their name followed by the command come. When they do come to you, praise and reward them with a treat again.

Lastly, for them to heel, put them on a leash, with a treat on the other hand far enough for them not to notice it. Call him and then say heel, when you get his attention, walk a few steps forwards. If he moves immediately to your heel, praise and reward him.

Pointer training may be tricky at times, and certainly tiring, but practice makes perfect. Remember these tips and your Pointer will soon be obedient.

More Pointer Dog Breeds

Usually referred to as the English Pointer, the Pointer dog is part of several pointing breeds, a breed developed mainly to become gun dogs. Pointer dogs are graceful and athletic, giving off the impression of a hard-driving, compact hunting dog always alert and ready to go. The breed is distinguished through its head, tail, and feet, with terrier or hound characteristics considered undesirable. Pointers come in standard colors of lemon and white, liver and white, black and white, and orange and white, with most dogs having mostly white bodies. Males grow up to heights of 25 to 28 inches and weights of 55 to 75 pounds while the females clock in at 23 to 26 inches and 45 to 65 pounds, respectively.

A Pointer dog is even-tempered and congenial, at its happiest when living indoors with a family. Pointers are loyal and affectionate, with very low aggression levels and easily sociable with other dogs as well as cats. They are not territorial generally, although they may intimidate a lot of visitors to the house. They are also great with children although young Pointers have a tendency to be clumsy so they might not be suitable around little tots when they themselves are little. Pointers are bred to be hunting companions but they will do fine with other kinds of exercise. They do like to gallop so they will need some space to run around in, but even so, they will also be perfectly comfortably indoors as well, relaxing on the sofa like any other couch potato.

A Pointer dog can typically be expected to live up to an average of 12 years, according to a survey by the UK Kennel Club. Pointers, like other breeds, are susceptible to certain health conditions, like allergies, epilepsy, cherry eye, and hip dysplasia. Nevertheless, Pointers are considered to be pretty genetically sound.

In terms of grooming, it is very easy to care for Pointer dogs because you just need to regularly brush their coat with a firm bristle brush. Bathing is needed only when necessary. Actually, just rubbing their coat with a towel will be enough to give it a good sheen. Just don’t forget to clean their feet after they have been out exercising and be ready for some shedding. If your Pointer dog gets wet in the rain when outdoors, bring it in and dry it thoroughly to prevent chilling and avoid colds.